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Global Challenges
Issue no. 14 | November 2023
The Future of Universities
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Issue no. 14 | November 2023
The Future of Universities

Neoliberal globalisation has not only transformed the role of the state; it has also shaken up the internal “DNA” of education policies, from schools to universities. New technologies have paved the way for new forms of transmitting knowledge; calls to decolonise curricula are growing louder; in the South, many countries face the challenge of financing public education policies in an era of new public management, while the model and transfer of these policies have become a key problem, compounded by the exclusion of historically marginalised populations and the advance of private and religious players. Against this backdrop of criticism of the public education model, the present Dossier seeks to better apprehend what could be done to restore the purpose and meaning of education and universities.

Articles for this issue

The Future of Universities
  • I
     

    Universities in the 21st Century: A Changing Global Landscape

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 1
     

    Futures of Higher Education and the Recovery of Purpose

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 2
     

    Reimagining Education in the Knowledge Society

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 3
     

    Education Policies: Foundational Research beyond Agenda Setting

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 4
     

    AI in Education and Research: Towards a More Ethical Engagement

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 5
     

    Data Assets and the Future Governance of Higher Education

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 6
     

    Higher Education, Decolonisation and the Global South

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 7
     

    University and Migration: New Directions for African Students

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 8
     

    The Conundrum of Race and Affirmative Action in Higher Education

    Reading time: 7 min
  • 9
     

    The Sino-American Competition in Higher Education

    Reading time: 4 min
  • O
     
     View of interior inside the Ulster University new Belfast campus Block C.

    Resources of the Geneva Graduate Institute in the Field of Higher Education

    Reading time: 3 min
Other Issues
Issue no. 10 | October 2021
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Decolonisation:
A Past That Keeps Questioning Us
Global Challenges
Issue no. 10 | October 2021
Decolonisation: A Past That Keeps Questioning Us

Today, we observe a renewed interest in the theme of decolonisation in three interrelated fields: in the academic world which opens new areas of research and teaching (e.g. decolonisation studies; decolonising the curriculum), in the practice of professionals and international actors who are revisiting their way of working, as well as in the vocabulary and activism of civil society targeting the remnants of colonial times such as street names, statues or museum objects. The renewed focus on decolonisation brings forth underlying issues such as the lingering of Eurocentrism, continued oppression of indigenous people, cultural relativism, the ongoing materiality of colonialism, the guilt of the West or, more generally, “the darker side of Western modernity”. While decolonisation has had a lasting impact on the political scene (with the decolonisation movements of the 1960s) and theoretically in the realm of academia, it lags behind in practice as processes, mentalities and epistemes are still permeated by “coloniality”. The present issue puts therefore decolonisation into historical perspective and provides fresh analytical perspectives on its epistemologies and methodologies as well as its practical application and consequences in various fields.

This issue has been coproduced by the Graduate Institute’s Department of International History and Politics and the Research Office. It also includes contributions from other research centres and departments of the Institute.

Issue no. 6 | November 2019
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Endangered Earth
Global Challenges
Issue no. 6 | November 2019
Endangered Earth

Soil is an essential component of the Earth's ecosystem. It contributes to and fulfills a wide range of environmental and societal functions such as food production, water filtering, carbon storage and the preservation of biodiversity essential to the survival of the human species. While soils have witnessed significant environmental degradation in recent decades, lands have been the object of increased economic competition and financial speculation. The commercial and financial scramble for land has never been more intense as transnational actors and governments such as the Chinese seek large scale bids for land in the Global South that have been likened to new forms of neocolonialism. The consequences of this double tension include the loss of biodiversity, floods, climate change, famines, forced migration and conflict. 

It is the assumption of the present Dossier that issues such as large scale exploitation of land and natural resources, soil degradation, biodiversity, food security and climate change are closely interdependent and cannot be treated in isolation. Seeking to explore and better understand the interlinkages between the material degradation of soils and the increased extractive, commercial and speculative pressure on lands, the Dossier aims to address some of the broader stakes the Anthropocene is currently facing: How irreversible is the damage that has been caused to earth's soils? Have we reached a point of no return? How many people is the earth able to feed and for how long? Are we trapped in a Malthusian logic? How will climate change depend and interact with changing patterns of soil distribution and depletion? What is the impact of large scale deforestation and natural resource extraction on the environment, particularly the soils? What are the governance patterns and technological solutions emerging to address land depletion and scarcity? What are some of the cybernetic loops and mechanisms of autoregulation through which the earth reacts to human interference?