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Global Challenges
Issue no. 12 | November 2022
The Weaponisation of Economics
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Issue no. 12 | November 2022
The Weaponisation of Economics

The multipolar world succeeding US hegemony in the early 21st century, the financial crisis of 2007 and the corollary decline of liberalism seem to have ushered in an era of economic nationalism. States are increasingly left to fend for themselves as multilateral mechanisms lose traction and international economic relations gain in toxicity. The sanctions, embargoes and retaliations arising from the war in Ukraine, but also an accelerating struggle for dwindling natural resources, have pushed these logics to new heights. This Dossier assesses ongoing geoeconomic transformations and their potentially devastating consequences.

Articles for this issue

The Weaponisation of Economics
  • I
     

    War by Other Means? Geoeconomics in the 21st Century

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 1
     

    Globalisation: The Danger of Safe Spaces

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 2
     

    Risky Interdependence: The Impact of Geoeconomics on Trade Policy

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 3
     

    A New Page in Global Sanctions Practice: The Russian Case

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 4
     

    The Politicisation of the Commodities Trade

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 5
     
    The United Nations logo on the 2nd Floor looking to the general assembly entrance

    Sanctions against Russia and the Role of the United Nations

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 6
     
    Global natural resources commodity trade with exchange of futures contracts on commodities

    A Renewed Neocolonial Scramble for Resources?

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 7
     

    The Rise of Geoeconomics

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 8
     

    Debt as a Political Weapon?

    Reading time: 5 min
  • O
     

    Global Sanctions: A Bibliography from the Graduate Institute

    Reading time: 5 min
Other Issues
Issue no. 10 | October 2021
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Decolonisation:
A Past That Keeps Questioning Us
Global Challenges
Issue no. 10 | October 2021
Decolonisation: A Past That Keeps Questioning Us

Today, we observe a renewed interest in the theme of decolonisation in three interrelated fields: in the academic world which opens new areas of research and teaching (e.g. decolonisation studies; decolonising the curriculum), in the practice of professionals and international actors who are revisiting their way of working, as well as in the vocabulary and activism of civil society targeting the remnants of colonial times such as street names, statues or museum objects. The renewed focus on decolonisation brings forth underlying issues such as the lingering of Eurocentrism, continued oppression of indigenous people, cultural relativism, the ongoing materiality of colonialism, the guilt of the West or, more generally, “the darker side of Western modernity”. While decolonisation has had a lasting impact on the political scene (with the decolonisation movements of the 1960s) and theoretically in the realm of academia, it lags behind in practice as processes, mentalities and epistemes are still permeated by “coloniality”. The present issue puts therefore decolonisation into historical perspective and provides fresh analytical perspectives on its epistemologies and methodologies as well as its practical application and consequences in various fields.

This issue has been coproduced by the Graduate Institute’s Department of International History and Politics and the Research Office. It also includes contributions from other research centres and departments of the Institute.

Issue no. 1 | February 2017
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South China Sea:
War on the Horizon?
Global Challenges
Issue no. 1 | February 2017
South China Sea: War on the Horizon?

While the global balance of power, under the impetus of the steady rise of China, is shifting towards the Asia-Pacific, and because the future of US policy is uncertain after the election of Donald Trump, tensions in the South China Sea have once again become a major strategic concern. The South China Sea is witnessing a series of sovereignty disputes between littoral states defending rivalling claims to maritime rights and boundaries. Adding weight and urgency to the disputes are the significant natural resources found in the coveted archipelagos and sea beds as well as the rising national sentiments in many of the claimant states. The geostrategic dimension of these quarrels is largely transcending the region and the involvement of external powers such as the United States further complicates the equation. The recent legal victory of the Philippines over China can be seen as a supplementary cause for anxiety in a latent conflict that may at any time escalate into a regional or global confrontation. Henceforth the search for a negotiated solution becomes crucial as military budgets continue to soar in the region.