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Global Challenges
Issue no. 8 | November 2020
The New Frontiers of Risk
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Issue no. 8 | November 2020
The New Frontiers of Risk

After the outbreak of COVID-19 – a virus constituting a genuinely worldwide risk – fear internationalised in just a few weeks. As the COVID crisis has profoundly shaken societies on a global scale it has contributed to a reconfiguration – perhaps a multiplication – of risks and their perceptions. While foremost constituting a biological hazard, the pandemic has large repercussions on other types of risks, ranging from long-term economic and digital disruption to psychological distress and political confrontation. The nature and frontiers of risks are thus moving as the multilateral system, the most adequate framework to deal with global risks, is ailing and current risk mitigation strategies are increasingly put to question. The six articles of the present Dossier explore these changing hierarchies of risk and the underpinning structural issues that endanger our existence.

Articles for this issue

The New Frontiers of Risk
  • I
     

    The Paradox of Risk in an Age of Global Contraction

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 1
     

    Moment of Surprise: The Anatomy of Biomedical Risk

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 2
     

    Finance and Risk over the Long Run

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 3
     

    Systemic Risk in the Financial System

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 4
     

    Understanding Global Environmental and Health Risks in the 21st Century

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 5
     

    Risky Entanglements between States and Online Platforms

    Reading time: 5 min
Other Issues
Issue no. 4 | October 2018
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Epidemia of Walls in an (Un)free World
Global Challenges
Issue no. 4 | October 2018
Epidemia of Walls in an (Un)free World

We currently face a baffling paradox. While since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 a seemingly inexorable process of globalisation has been foreshadowing a peaceful and frontierless world, the number of walls across the world has been rising at a steady pace. Liberal and open societies buttressed by trade, international law and technological progress were supposed to implacably contribute to the erosion of frontiers and walls between nations. However, in a context of surging populist discourses, securitarian anxieties and identitarian politics as well as concomitant flows of migration alimented by climate change, conflict and poverty, nations have recently started to barricade themselves behind new walls.