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Global Challenges
Issue no. 7 | April 2020
Global Governance in Peril?
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Issue no. 7 | April 2020
Global Governance in Peril?

The present Dossier takes stock of the current state of the multilateral system and its future prospects. It aims to explore to what extent global governance is in crisis as the global geopolitical order is undergoing fundamental shifts and liberal universalism is losing traction. It assesses potential of reform in extant institutions as well as emerging trends, tools and forums that are reshaping multilateral practice on a daily basis.
Note – The dossier was drafted before the Covid-19 world crisis.

Articles for this issue

Global Governance in Peril?
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    bty

    Multilateralism Is in Crisis – Or Is It?

    Reading time: 5 min
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    The Role of Transnational Policy Networks in Contemporary Global Governance

    Reading time: 4 min
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    United Nations stamp showing Palais des Nations, Geneva.

    The United Nations at 75: Still “Resolved to Combine Our Efforts”?

    Reading time: 4 min
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    Anti-G8 activists hold globes reading, “Hello G20? This is the rest of the world” as they take part in a demonstration in Le Havre, France, on 21 May 2011.

    What Future Role for the Gs in the Multilateral System?

    Reading time: 3 min
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    Mural by Dean Cornwell (1892–1960) in the Centre William Rappard, former home of the International Labour Office and current home of the World Trade Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

    US Pressure on the WTO: A Chance to Rebound?

    Reading time: 4 min
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    Beyond Multilateralism: The Pauli Principle

    Reading time: 4 min
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    Global Internet Governance: Is Fragmentation Avoidable?

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 7
     

    Governing the World outside the United Nations

    Reading time: 5 min
Other Issues
Special Issue no. 1 | June 2020
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Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic
Global Challenges
Special Issue no. 1 | June 2020
Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic

A pandemic is not just a medical emergency – it is also a political, economic, and social crisis. It implies new challenges for democratic institutions and practices, for citizenship rights and human rights as some of the restrictions on civil liberties put in place by liberal and illiberal democracies may well outlive the coronavirus. This special issue explores some tensions and dilemmas of democracies faced with the current crisis. “Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemics” addresses questions like: Can we speak of a decline in politics during the pandemic? While states have been using the full gamut of their sovereign prerogatives, has the political (temporarily) faded in the face of, for example, “expertise”? What will be the lasting impact of the rule by administrative fiat, and of emergency powers put in place in many countries? What kinds of agenda and instruments of civic activism are likely to emerge given that courts are rarely in session and public protest not permitted due to distancing rules? What are the likely consequences of these reconfigurations for democracy, governance, and welfare systems in the global South and North?

Issue no. 2 | September 2017
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Democracy at Risk
Global Challenges
Issue no. 2 | September 2017
Democracy at Risk

While the 20th century has been characterised by the generalisation of democratisation processes, the 21st century seems to have started with the reverse trend. An authoritarian-populist nexus is threatening liberal democracy on a global scale, including in its American and European heartlands. Charismatic leaders – thriving on electoral majorities and popular referenda – methodically undermine the rule of law and constitutional safeguards in order to consolidate their own power basis. Coupling inflammatory rhetoric with modern communication technologies, they short-circuit traditional elites and refuse to abide by international norms. Agitating contemporary scourges such as insecurity, loss of identity, mass migration and corrupt elites, they put in place new laws and mechanisms to harness civil society and political opponents. In order to better understand the novelty, permanence and global reach of “illiberal democracy”, this second issue of Global Challenges proposes seven case studies (Russia, Hungary, Turkey, the Middle East, Uganda, Venezuela and the United States) complemented by a series of expert interviews, maps and infographics.