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Global Challenges
Issue no. 3 | March 2018
Globalization 4.0:
Evolution or Revolution?
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Issue no. 3 | March 2018
Globalization 4.0: Evolution or Revolution?

Has globalisation reached its apex after centuries of growth as suggested by the latest figures of the WTO? In the affirmative, does this imply that we are ushering into a new era of degrowth? Or are we witnessing the reorganisation of the very architecture of globalisation, which remains based on the twin logic of the acceleration and continuous increase of the volume of exchanges, as well as the steady densification of geographic connectedness. Are global exchanges restructuring concomitantly to the fourth technological revolution and the expansion of the digital economy? The present Dossier proposes to approach this question by observing the nature and the evolution of the principal flows that characterize globalisation.

Articles for this issue

Globalization 4.0:
Evolution or Revolution?
  • I
     
    Détail du monument de Budge-Budge (Kolkata) en mémoire des passagers du Komagata Maru,
refoulés du Canada en 1914

    Globalisation Unbound:
    Transnational Flows in the Digital Era

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 1
     
    Painter and movie director, Banksy is an antisystem urban artist

    The Changing Paradigm of Trade in the 21st Century

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 2
     

    Energy Trading:
    An Uncertain Horizon

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 3
     

    Flowing with Data:
    Digital Humanitarianism Today

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 4
     

    International Migration:
    A Canary in the Coalmine of Globalisation

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 5
     

    Public Policy in the Spiral of Universalising Education Standards

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 6
     

    The Global Threat of Epidemics One Century after the Spanish Influenza

    Reading time: 4 min
Other Issues
Issue no. 4 | October 2018
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Epidemia of Walls in an (Un)free World
Global Challenges
Issue no. 4 | October 2018
Epidemia of Walls in an (Un)free World

We currently face a baffling paradox. While since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 a seemingly inexorable process of globalisation has been foreshadowing a peaceful and frontierless world, the number of walls across the world has been rising at a steady pace. Liberal and open societies buttressed by trade, international law and technological progress were supposed to implacably contribute to the erosion of frontiers and walls between nations. However, in a context of surging populist discourses, securitarian anxieties and identitarian politics as well as concomitant flows of migration alimented by climate change, conflict and poverty, nations have recently started to barricade themselves behind new walls.

Issue no. 5 | April 2019
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New Grammars of War:
Conflict and Violence in the 21st Century
Global Challenges
Issue no. 5 | April 2019
New Grammars of War: Conflict and Violence in the 21st Century

The Dossier aims to explore new trends and expressions of violence in armed conflict in the 21st century. Taking as a starting point the changing paradigm of armed conflict – from conventional wars with clear contours towards more non-linear, fragmented and protracted types of civil and international conflict — it adopts a broad approach to portray changing forms of violence across different types of armed conflicts (including terrorism, international/civil wars or urban warfare). In the context of a fragmenting international order, with increasingly blurred lines between state and non-state, combatant and civilian, domestic and international, the number of actors involved in conflicts and concurrent strategies of violence have multiplied. In face of the ubiquity of violent conflict — despite an overall decline in interstate conflict and global number of casualties — the Dossier aims to shed light on new or changing forms of violence, their contexts, actors and victims. It explores the novelty, heterogeneity, scales and vectors of violent practices in contemporary conflicts by investigating the impact of a series of factors such as new military technologies (drones, robots), new communication tools (social media), gender, migration, or the subcontracting of security to private actors.