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Global Challenges
Special Issue no. 1 | June 2020
Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Special Issue no. 1 | June 2020
Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic

A pandemic is not just a medical emergency – it is also a political, economic, and social crisis. It implies new challenges for democratic institutions and practices, for citizenship rights and human rights as some of the restrictions on civil liberties put in place by liberal and illiberal democracies may well outlive the coronavirus. This special issue explores some tensions and dilemmas of democracies faced with the current crisis. “Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemics” addresses questions like: Can we speak of a decline in politics during the pandemic? While states have been using the full gamut of their sovereign prerogatives, has the political (temporarily) faded in the face of, for example, “expertise”? What will be the lasting impact of the rule by administrative fiat, and of emergency powers put in place in many countries? What kinds of agenda and instruments of civic activism are likely to emerge given that courts are rarely in session and public protest not permitted due to distancing rules? What are the likely consequences of these reconfigurations for democracy, governance, and welfare systems in the global South and North?

Articles for this issue

Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic
  • I
     

    Covid-19: A Modern Apocalypse or a Temporary Shock to the System?

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 1
     
    Stop coronavirus banner. Spartan shield, syringes and viruses. Vaccine development, combating the pandemic. COVID-19 (2019-nCoV) art. Protection of immune system. Medical background

    The Vaccine Race: Will Public Health Prevail over Geopolitics?

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 2
     

    Institutions under Stress: Covid-19, Anti-Internationalism and the Futures of Global Governance

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 3
     
    The Great Depression – Unemployed men queued outside a soup kitchen opened in Chicago by Al Capone.

    Covid-19 and Even More Unconventional Economic Policies

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 4
     

    Covid-19 and States of Emergency

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 5
     

    Pandemic as Revelation: What Does It Tell Us about People on the Move?

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 6
     

    Pandemic and Political Geographies

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 7
     
    “The Plague in Rome” by Jules Elie Delaunay, 1869.

    The Western Flu: The Coronavirus Pandemic as a Eurocentric Crisis

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 8
     

    A Gendered Perspective on the Pandemic

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 9
     

    A National-Liberal Virus

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 10
     

    Depoliticising through Expertise: The Politics of Modelling in the Governance of Covid-19

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 11
     
    Yayoi Kusama's “Infinity Mirror Room” in the Broad Museum, 8 August 2019, Los Angeles, California.

    The Politics of Covid Apps

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 12
     

    Human Rights and Covid-19

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 13
     

    Emergency Use of Public Funds: Implications for Democratic Governance

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 14
     

    Unequal Impacts of Covid-19: Political and Social Consequences

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 15
     

    Covid, Hysteresis, and the Future of Work

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 16
     

    Populism 4.0 and Decent Digiwork

    Reading time: 5 min
Other Issues
Forthcoming Special Issue | March 2023
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Urban Morphology & Violence
Global Challenges
Forthcoming Special Issue | March 2023
Urban Morphology & Violence

The essays in this volume are the product of a new 'research practicum' course in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the Graduate Institute in Geneva. They build on the debates on 'Urban Morphology and violence' to reflect on the associations between cities - their political orders and disorders - and outcomes ranging from occupation and resistance to marginalisation and containment. These texts foreshadow the possibility of centring - and challenging - the urban in our understanding of contemporary conflict, violence and peace. They are a first step in opening up a research agenda for a more textured analysis of spatial, geographical and temporal dynamics within the city in relation to violence, and, therefore, the mobilisation of spatial, temporal and visual modes of analysis. The promise is to make visible the varied roles of urban morphologies - adding to the debate on cities in and as sites of conflict.