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Global Challenges
Issue no. 10 | October 2021
Decolonisation:
A Past That Keeps Questioning Us
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Articles for this issue
Global Challenges
Issue no. 10 | October 2021
Decolonisation: A Past That Keeps Questioning Us

Today, we observe a renewed interest in the theme of decolonisation in three interrelated fields: in the academic world which opens new areas of research and teaching (e.g. decolonisation studies; decolonising the curriculum), in the practice of professionals and international actors who are revisiting their way of working, as well as in the vocabulary and activism of civil society targeting the remnants of colonial times such as street names, statues or museum objects. The renewed focus on decolonisation brings forth underlying issues such as the lingering of Eurocentrism, continued oppression of indigenous people, cultural relativism, the ongoing materiality of colonialism, the guilt of the West or, more generally, “the darker side of Western modernity”. While decolonisation has had a lasting impact on the political scene (with the decolonisation movements of the 1960s) and theoretically in the realm of academia, it lags behind in practice as processes, mentalities and epistemes are still permeated by “coloniality”. The present issue puts therefore decolonisation into historical perspective and provides fresh analytical perspectives on its epistemologies and methodologies as well as its practical application and consequences in various fields.

This issue has been coproduced by the Graduate Institute’s Department of International History and Politics and the Research Office. It also includes contributions from other research centres and departments of the Institute.

Articles for this issue

Decolonisation:
A Past That Keeps Questioning Us
  • I
     
    Lisbon, Portugal - April 20, 2016: a fragment of mappa mundi as part of The Monument of the Discoveries which celebrates the Portuguese Age of Discovery (or Age of Exploration)

    Decolonisation: The Many Facets of an Ongoing Struggle

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 1
     
    Old map of world hemispheres by Frederick de Wit, published In Amsterdam, 1668.

    Varieties of Decolonisation

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 2
     
    Wooden masks for sale in a shop in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Decolonisation: Too Simple a Term for a Complicated History

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 3
     
    Map of the word made from different kinds of spices.

    Decolonisation and Regionalism

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 4
     
    Bristol, UK. Statue of Edward Colston with blindfold before it was taken down by protestors. 6 May 2020.

    Decolonising International Politics

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 5
     
    Rendering of planet Earth chained and locked with padlock as global lockdown metaphor.

    Decolonising the Global

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 6
     
    The Hague, Netherlands. Logo of the bench of the International Court of Justice in the Peace Palace. 18 December 2019.

    Decolonisation and International Law

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 7
     
    Rainbow coloured flag and LGBT community demonstration with hearts.

    Gender and Decolonisation

    Reading time: 6 min
  • 8
     
    Stamp printed in the Guinea-Bissau, 1985.

    Decolonisation and Humanitarianism

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 9
     
    Incomplete Earth globe puzzle near medical face masks and airplane model on wooden background.

    Decolonisation and Global Health

    Reading time: 5 min
  • 10
     
    African American academic students at Roger Williams University in Nashville, Tennessee, ca. 1899.

    Decolonising Education

    Reading time: 4 min
  • 11
     
    Concept of social networking service.

    Three Decolonial Questionings of the Digital

    Reading time: 5 min
  • O
     

    Selected Publications from the Graduate Institute about Colonisation and Decolonisation

    Reading time: 4 min
Other Issues
Special Issue no. 1 | June 2020
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Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic
Global Challenges
Special Issue no. 1 | June 2020
Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemic

A pandemic is not just a medical emergency – it is also a political, economic, and social crisis. It implies new challenges for democratic institutions and practices, for citizenship rights and human rights as some of the restrictions on civil liberties put in place by liberal and illiberal democracies may well outlive the coronavirus. This special issue explores some tensions and dilemmas of democracies faced with the current crisis. “Politics of the Coronavirus Pandemics” addresses questions like: Can we speak of a decline in politics during the pandemic? While states have been using the full gamut of their sovereign prerogatives, has the political (temporarily) faded in the face of, for example, “expertise”? What will be the lasting impact of the rule by administrative fiat, and of emergency powers put in place in many countries? What kinds of agenda and instruments of civic activism are likely to emerge given that courts are rarely in session and public protest not permitted due to distancing rules? What are the likely consequences of these reconfigurations for democracy, governance, and welfare systems in the global South and North?